Yukon Ombudsman Yukon Information and Privacy Commissioner Yukon Public Interest Disclosure Commissioner

Yukon Information and Privacy Commissioner

Your Rights under Yukon's Access and Privacy Laws

This page is currently being updated to reflect changes to the ATTIP Act (2018) that went into effect April 1, 2021. Information found on this page relating to ATIPP may not be accurate in all places. Please contact our office for up to date answers to your questions.


There are two access and privacy laws in Yukon.  They are the Health Information Privacy and Management Act and the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act.

The Health Information Privacy and Management Act (HIPMA)

HIPMA applies to custodians and establishes a set of rules that custodians must follow in providing access to and protection of personal health information that they hold. 

Custodians include most health care providers, operators of health facilities and hospitals, the Yukon Government Department of Health and Social Services, the Kwanlin Dun First Nation Health Centre, the Many Rivers Counselling and Support Services Society, and the Child Development Centre. 

Health care providers include chiropractors, dentists and related professionals, optometrists, pharmacists, physicians, physiotherapists, nurses, psychologists, occupational therapists, midwives, naturopaths, and speech pathologists. 

Health facilities include medical clinics, community health centres, dental clinics, laboratories, specimen collection centres, pharmacies, nursing homes, and long-term care facilities. 

HIPMA also establishes a set of rights for individuals.  Under HIPMA, you have the right to:

  • examine or receive a copy of your personal health information, subject only to limited exceptions;
  • request corrections of any inaccurate personal health information in a record held by a custodian;
  • give or refuse your consent to the collection, use, or disclosure of your personal health information, except in certain specified circumstances;
  • be informed of the reasons for the collection, use, and disclosure of your personal health information;
  • withdraw your consent for any collection, use, or disclosure of your personal health information;
  • subject to some limitations, expressly instruct that your personal health information not be used or disclosed for health care or other purposes without your consent;
  • expect custodians to implement information practices that will protect your personal health information from unauthorized collection, use, access, disclosure, disposal or destruction, and other security breaches;
  • be notified if you are at risk of significant harm as a result of a security breach involving your personal health information;
  • complain to our Office if you are refused access to your personal health information or for any other violation of HIPMA if you reasonably believe a custodian or their agent* has acted contrary to HIPMA;

*An agent of a custodian includes their employees.

The Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act (ATIPP)

ATIPP applies to public bodies and establishes rules that allow access to any records held by a public body, including access to an individual’s own personal information.  It also establishes rules for privacy protection of any personal information held by a public body. 

Public bodies include departments of the Yukon Government, Yukon Housing Corp., Yukon Lottery Corp., Yukon Liquor Corp., Yukon College, Workers Compensation Health and Safety Board, Yukon Hospital Corp., First Nation service authority, Child and Youth Advocate, and some boards, commissions and foundations established as an agent of government. 

ATIPP also establishes a set of rights for individuals.  Under ATIPP, you have the right to:

  • access any record held by a public body, subject only to limited and specific exceptions;
  • access your own personal information, also subject only to limited and specific exceptions;
  • request the correction of inaccurate personal information;
  • be informed of the purpose for the collection of your personal information;
  • expect that public bodies will protect the privacy of your personal information according to the rules established by ATIPP for this protection;
  • request the IPC to review:
    • any action, omission, or decision by a public body that relates to your request for access to information including any refusal to provide you with access to a record or information in a record;
    • a public body’s decision to release to another person your personal or business information in response to that person’s request to access this information;
    • your complaint that a public body collected, used or disclosed your personal information contrary to ATIPP; and
    • a refusal by a public body to correct inaccurate personal information;
  • make a complaint to our office about any other contravention of the ATIPP Act by a public body in administering the ATIPP, including improper processing of an access to information request, a failure to adequately search for records or assist you in obtaining access to information, improper security of personal information or the potential for unauthorized collection, use, access, disclosure, or disposal or destruction of your personal information. 

Relevant FAQs

Is the Information and Privacy Commissioner part of government?

No, the Information and Privacy Commissioner (IPC) is an independent officer of the Yukon Legislative Assembly and is, therefore, not part of the Yukon government.

In Yukon, the IPC is the same person as the Ombudsman and the Public Interest Disclosure Commissioner.  Click on each role for more information.

The IPC is responsible for monitoring compliance with the Health Information Privacy and Management Act (HIPMA) and the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act (ATIPP).

ATIPP applies to Yukon public bodies, such as Yukon government departments.  HIPMA applies to custodians (see ‘What is a custodian?’). For more information about HIPMA see the HIPMA FAQ section.

The IPC has a number of responsibilities under these Acts and has broad authority to investigate complaints made, including the power to compel production of records and witnesses.  Under ATIPP and HIPMA, the IPC also has adjudicative authority which means her office can make findings of fact and law that are binding on public bodies and custodians subject to the Acts.

All FAQs