Yukon Ombudsman Yukon Information and Privacy Commissioner Yukon Public Interest Disclosure Commissioner

Yukon Information and Privacy Commissioner

Presentations and Workshops

The Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner (IPC) works to promote openness and accountability in public administration, in part through providing public education about access to information and protection of privacy rights in general and those set out in the ATIPP Act. Here you will find  presentations and workshops that were hosted by the IPC to assist with learning about privacy rights.

 

Privacy Impact Assessment Workshop

A public body can effectively assess and manage privacy risks for any project involving personal information by conducting a privacy impact assessment (PIA). Completing a PIA enables a public body to identify any risks associated with the collection, use or disclosure or security of personal information and ensure the information is properly managed in compliance with the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act (ATIPP Act).

In January 2015 the Information and Privacy Commissioner held a workshop to create awareness of the importance of conducting a PIA. The workshop is being provided to you here. Please read the instructions prior to beginning the workshop so you know how to effectively navigate through the workshop. If you have any questions pleae contact our office at 667-8468.

To obtain the most current Yukon Government PIA template contact Jeff Sunstrum, Yukon Government ATIPP Office, at 667-3510.


Privacy Management Program Workshop

Yukon public bodies can effectively manage their obligations under the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act by implementing a primacy management program.

In January 2015 the Information and Privacy Commissioner held a workshop about how to implement a privacy management program. The workshop is provided to you here. Please read the instructions prior to beginning the workshop so you know how to effectively navigate through the workshop. If you have any questions please contact our office at 667-8468.


Privacy Under ATIPP Workshop

Understanding how to manage your work while complying with the Protection of Privacy requirements in the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act is important for all employees of Yukon Government and other public bodies subject to the Act. Whether these requirements are new to you or you need an update, this one-day workshop hosted by the Information and Privacy Commissioner on September 30, 2015 will help by focussing on the rules and standards set out in Part 3.

The day will begin with a brief overview of the history, key concepts, and organization of legislation and will then explore in detail the access processes and exceptions, the general rules for collection, use, disclosure, accuracy, retention and protection of personal information. The session will include engaging and interactive group work to allow application of the concepts and rules to exercises and scenarios.

 

The Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner of British Columbia developed the following guidance material in conjunction with the Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Alberta and Canada.

Click on the following respective links to view a printable version of the guidance material on Privacy Impact Assessments and Privacy Management Programs.


Privacy Policy and Program Development Workshop

The Information and Privacy Commissioner is hosting a one-day workshop on September 29 and October 1, 2015. This workshop will focus on the practical implementation of privacy compliance in the development of policy structure and initiatives for Yukon Government operating programs. The course will provide guidance on conducting a gaps assessment, and designing and integrating privacy elements effectively into the way the program does business based on its own functional needs.

Discussion will include, among other topics, the goals and components of policy development, privacy impact assessment, personal information identification and management, information flows, privacy breach response, and third party management. There will be an extended interactive component where you will be able to apply policy and program strategies to your own program areas.

The Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner of British Columbia developed the following guidance material in conjunction with the Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Alberta and Canada.

Click on the following respective links to view a printable version of the guidance material on Privacy Impact Assessments and Privacy Management Programs

Top

Relevant FAQs

Is the Information and Privacy Commissioner part of government?

No, the Information and Privacy Commissioner (IPC) is an independent officer of the Yukon Legislative Assembly and is, therefore, not part of the Yukon Government.

In Yukon, the IPC is the same person as the Ombudsman and the Public Interest Disclosure Commissioner.  For more information about these roles, our website at: http://www.ombudsman.yk.ca.

The IPC is responsible for monitoring compliance with HIPMA and the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act (ATIPP).

ATIPP applies to Yukon public bodies, such as Yukon Government departments.  HIPMA applies to custodians (see ‘What is a custodian?’).

The IPC has a number of responsibilities under these Acts and has broad authority to investigate complaints made, including the power to compel production of records and witnesses.  Under HIPMA, the IPC has adjudicative authority.  This means she can make findings of fact and law that are binding on custodians.  At the conclusion of an adjudication, called a ‘consideration’ under HIPMA, she has the authority to recommend any remedy that she determines appropriate.

When does the IPC hold inquiries?

Most requests for review initially proceed to mediation to try to settle the issues for review. Where a request for review is not completely settled during mediation, a party can ask the IPC to conduct an inquiry. The IPC has discretion to decide whether to proceed to inquiry.

What happens in an inquiry?

An inquiry is the final stage in the request for review process. An inquiry is a formal adjudicative process conducted by the IPC. The parties to an inquiry are entitled to make representations * to the IPC about the issues identified for inquiry. In most inquiries, the representations are made in writing and the parties do not appear before the IPC.

If the IPC decides to proceed to inquiry, a notice of inquiry is issued to the parties. The notice of inquiry outlines the next steps in the inquiry.  The notice of inquiry will confirm:

  • the parties to the inquiry,
  • the sections of the ATIPP Act that will be considered,
  • the issues for inquiry,
  • the timeline for notifying the IPC of any preliminary objections to the inquiry,
  • the schedule for delivery and exchange of initial and reply submissions from the parties, and
  • a deadline for requesting the IPC’s approval for “in camera”* submission material.

At the inquiry, the IPC considers the Fact Report prepared by the mediator, the representations received from the parties, reviews any records in dispute, and decides how each issue should be resolved and makes her recommendation(s) *. The IPC issues a written report to the parties setting out her findings, recommendation(s) and reasons for the findings and recommendation(s).  Some of the things the IPC can recommend are:

  • the  release of some or all of the information in a record
  • the modification of a fee waiver
  • the correction of personal information
All FAQs